Archives for posts with tag: skin health

There are a lot of skin care myths out there. To help you weed out what’s true and what’s not true when it comes to skin care, we put together this list of seven skin-care myths your mom probably never told you about:

Myth #1 – acne is caused by poor hygiene and eating certain foods aggravates the condition. First, acne is not caused by dirt. No matter how many times you wash your face and your body, acne may still appear. The cause of acne is an overproduction of sebum, or oil, which clogs the pores. The rate at which the skin on your face produces sebum is not at all affected by dirt. Hormones, stress, pollution and bacteria are some of the culprits behind the appearance of pimples. Additionally, consuming junk foods like chocolate, soda, fried foods and any other oily or greasy foods will not aggravate acne.  Of course, we don’t recommend that you load up on junk food.

Myth #2 – not washing your face often enough can cause blackheads. Many people have blackheads, especially on either sides of the nose. Just like pimples, blackheads are not caused by dirt, so washing your face more often than usual is not the solution. Blackheads appear when the pores become dilated; the cellular buildup leads to oxidation that causes that black color. If you want to steer clear of blackheads, use a good exfoliating face scrub that is suited for your skin type.

Myth #3 – going to a tanning booth is the safest way to add some color to your skin. This is not true at all. Whether it’s natural tanning under the heat of the sun or tanning under the tanning booth, you’re still exposing your skin to UVA rays. Experts agree that this type of exposure can still penetrate deep into the skin and cause damage like premature aging. In effect, you’re also exposing yourself to the risks of developing skin cancers.

Myth #4 – when looking for products that help shield your skin from the rays of the sun, all you need to look for is a higher SPF.  SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor, an ingredient that is ever-present in sunscreen lotions. Although a higher SPF will offer protection from ultraviolet rays, the SPF will only work in shielding your skin from UVB rays. There are other kinds of ultraviolet rays, including UVA and UVC, which some sunscreens may not necessarily protect you from. A good compromise would be to choose a product with SPF 15 or higher that contains ingredients that block both the UVA and UVB rays from penetrating into your skin.

Myth #5 – the more expensive a skin care product is, the better it is for your skin.

Myth #6 – a skin care product claims to be natural, it should be 100 percent good for my skin. First, there are no regulations in the market when it comes to using the term “natural.” Therefore, even if the product contains only one herbal ingredient, they can still use the term “natural.”

Myth #7 – dermatologist-tested and hypoallergenic products will work well for any skin type. What causes allergies for one person may not necessarily have the same effect for another person, so the term “hypoallergenic” is quite vague. Observe which products lead you to have breakouts or skin rashes and steer clear of them.

At the end of the day, taking care of your skin is all a matter of choosing the right products and having a good skin-care regimen that you can follow on a daily basis. Now that you know about the top skin-care myths and the truth behind them, you can make an informed decision about how to better care for your skin so that you can have that clear, smooth, and flawless complexion you want.

Pimples don’t only show up on the face.
For some, acne on the body is a real problem and can affect large areas of the body.  Body acne can affect the back, neck, chest, shoulders, and upper arms.  Back acne is pretty common among those with acne on the body.  Body acne can affect anybody, however most cases are seen in men.

Usually acne begins on the face and will start spreading to other areas of the body.  Not everyone with facial acne will develop body acne. Most everyone with body acne will have some kind of facial acne.

How does acne affect your body?
Like facial acne, body acne can be very embarrassing.  Many people will wear clothing to cover up so they don’t reveal their acne.  Even going out to do things and have fun can be uncomfortable.  You can’t swim. It’s also very difficult for teens with body acne to change in the locker room.  Acne on body can cause lasting scars, depending on the degree of inflammation.

What causes acne on the body?
The same causes of facial acne are attributed to acne on body; overactive oil glands, excessive dead skin cells, and many acne-causing bacteria we come in contact with everyday.  Oil and dead skin cells block the pores in your skin and create a blockage.  This area may become irritated and could turn into a pimple if bacteria invade.  Acne on body is usually found on the back and upper torso.  These areas have more glands so they are more vulnerable to the oils and sweat from your skin.  It’s not likely that your clothes would cause body acne, but the friction may affect existing areas of the body with acne.  Sweat is another cause of acne on the body, shower after workouts to keep skin healthy.

 

5 Diet Tips that help control Acne
Previously it was believed that fat caused acne — that’s a myth — it has nothing to with acne.   So acne is definitely not the fault of the pizza, but what you eat can definitely have an impact on the skin.

1. Milk
Milk is good for babies and small children, but not so good for young people — especially if you have acne.  Milk contains hormones that can exacerbate acne.  That doesn’t mean you can’t drink milk — coffee and cream or milk with cereal from time to time does not damage the skin.  Just try not to drink more than a glass of milk a day.

2. Sugar
This is not scientifically proven, but many doctors now believe that excess sugar can aggravate acne.

3. Fish Oil
Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish are not only good for general health, they are important for healthy skin and acne prevention. The best sources for Omega-3 fish include salmon, cod and tuna.  So eat more fish or you can take Omega-3 supplements.

4. Vitamins
Some vitamins are essential for treating acne.  Research has shown that both vitamin B5 and vitamin A in high doses can be excellent in treating acne. You should consult your doctor about the proper dosage before trying these because they can also be toxic.  Vitamin E is also important for healthy and beautiful skin.  Multivitamins are also a good way to prevent acne.  And of course, fruits and vegetables can help your vitamin intake.

5. Zinc
Zinc reduces acne because it boosts your immune system. Good sources of zinc are eggs, whole grains and mushrooms.

Follow these tips for at least two weeks and you should see their effects.  Don’t expect miracles, but in combination with other acne treatments, you’ll be happy with the results.

 

When you are living with acne it can be tough to think about anything else.  Your life revolves around getting rid of and concealing your pimples.  This can make other areas of your life suffer.  For a few folks their acne is so bad that they decide to stop socializing, they lose interest in friends and family and they become depressed.

THERE IS HOPE!
These days there are so many varieties of treatments for acne.  Best of all, doctors understand more of the causes of acne and ways to properly treat it. So you can get back to the fun things in life.

FIRST, HEAL YOUR PSYCHE.
Many sufferers learn to deal with acne because they have to.  Not only do you have to make the blemishes disappear but you also need to heal your mind from the trauma they created in the first place. Talk with your dermatologist; they will help you on the road to recovery.

SECOND, TACKLE THE PHYSICAL SCARS.
Living with acne once meant that you had to live with the scarring that it causes.  When acne gets severe and goes untreated your skin begins to develop pits and scars. These blemishes never depart and can stay on your face all your life.  These days there are things you can do to prevent and treat scarring; special facial treatments have been developed and special products have been developed to cover acne scars.

THIRD, DEVELOP LIFE-LONG HABITS.
Living with acne will be rough.  It has lasting effects on many people. The most effective method to combat acne is to prevent and control it before it gets severe.  Watch your diet, your water intake and most of all go to bed every night with a washed face.  Control that oil!  A soft exfoliating cleanser will help your skin feel refreshed and clean.

 

 

Coral Actives for Acne and More
Sea Whip Coral is what sets Ermis Labs apart from their many competitors. It’s a soft coral found in the Caribbean, and it is a very potent, natural anti-inflammatory extract that is safe, effective, and environmentally friendly. Sea Whip Extract is also a completely renewable resource. “Colonies of Sea Whip Coral have been researched by independent scientists since before 1990 and consistently monitored since 1996. Their studies, as well as the records of the exclusive harvester, show that the coral extract has been collected in a sustainable manner that has consistently resulted in complete re-growth.”

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Review: CoralActives Acne Treatment
I received these products for free, but I can honestly say that I will definitely be repurchasing them when I run out. For sure! If you have (occasional) breakouts or if you’re just interested in reducing redness/inflammation, you might want to consider Coral Actives. A+ in my book!

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CoralActives Acne Treatment
If you follow my blog, then you know about my skin issues. I have extremely oily skin. I don’t think I’ve ever seen my face completely matte. I also suffer from the occasional whiteheads (due to hormones or stress), which leave red spots on my skin for months…

Having good skin is really important to me. More important than makeup actually. Cause if my skin doesn’t look good, there’s no makeup in the world that will make it look completely flawless all day long!

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In 2005 the FDA provided a public draft guidance document to the pharmaceutical industry on how to develop drugs to treat acne vulgaris, or acne. The draft guidance document contains the FDA’s current thinking on the development of acne drugs and the methods that should be used.  Some of the guidance document information is summarized below. At the time of this writing the FDA document had not been finalized.

Types of Acne Lesions
The two major types of acne lesions are classified as non-inflammatory and inflammatory. Non-inflammatory acne lesions are more commonly known as whiteheads and blackheads. Inflammatory acne lesions include papules and pustules and are more deeply seated in the skin than the non-inflammatory lesions.

How Acne Severity Is Rated
Currently there is no standardized method for rating the severity of acne outbreaks. Several methods have been proposed, but each has its difficulties. A sample scale for rating acne severity is summarized below, from least to most severe:

  • (0)  Clear skin with no inflammatory or non-inflammatory lesions
  • (1)  Almost clear; rare non-inflammatory lesions with no more than one small inflammatory lesion
  • (2)  Mild severity; greater than Grade 1; some non-inflammatory lesions with no more than a few inflammatory lesions (papules/pustules only, no nodular lesions)
  • (3)  Moderate severity; greater than Grade 2; up to many non-inflammatory lesions and may have some inflammatory lesions, but no more than one small nodular lesion
  • (4*)  Severe; greater than Grade 3; up to many non-inflammatory and inflammatory lesions, but no more than a few nodular lesions
    (* worsening beyond Grade 4 is possible).

Acne Drug Treatment Study Groups
Pharmaceutical companies recruit participants to form test groups, which consist of people with similar symptoms who use the medication to test its effectiveness. Acne drug test groups should be large enough to be statistically significant so that any claims of success and safety can be supported. Test patients are usually recruited during their most severe acne breakouts.  Acne drug trials are recommended to be randomized, blinded, multicenter trials, and other requirements will also apply. A control or placebo group should be utilized.  Furthermore, those doing testing should recruit test populations that are representative of the age, race, gender, and geographic location of acne patients in the United States.

Determining The Success Of Acne Drug Treatments
Acne severity is rated at the beginning and end of every test. Photographic evidence and/or lesion counts may also be taken. It is proposed to measure the success of acne medications as either a success or a failure, based on one of these two methods of measuring success:

  1. Success meaning a rating of clear skin or almost clear (severity rating 0 or 1) within the test period; or
  2. Success meaning an improvement of 2 severity grades within the test period. Under this definition, a successful test subject would have a severity improvement from 4 to 2 within the test period, as an example.

The Final Decision On New Acne Drugs
Several phases of testing are recommended for proposed acne drugs. Studies must be designed to account for effects such as test dropouts. Rigorous data analysis must be performed in conformance with FDA regulations. Only acne drug test data that has been validated and undergone quality assurance testing should be submitted to the FDA for approval.  Only through a rigorous and tightly-controlled testing and analysis procedure, followed by FDA approval, can new acne drugs be made available to the public.

The team at ermis LABS went to great expense to place their CoralActives acne products in airless pumps.  Why?

One word – OXYGEN

We all know that oxygen is essential to life. But in the beauty business, it can wreak havoc, attacking the chemical stability and microbiological integrity of a company’s finely crafted formulation.

Air, user interaction and even sunlight can cause discoloration, funky odors, and at its worst, a contaminated product.  Not only does it help protect products from contamination during the filling process and when in use by the consumer, airless packaging aids in dispensability – we want customers to get the same amount every time they press the nozzle.

Washing your face every day is crucial, no matter your age or skin type.

When you wash your face, you remove any impurities, makeup residue and oil which if not removed may lead to some serious skin problems.  Nowadays there is a wide range of facial cleansers – foams, gels, creams designed for every skin type from oily to hypersensitive.  The cleansers gently clean the skin without irritating it; they remove all the impurities – dirt, oil, that have accumulated during the day or during the night, leaving the skin clean, tight and soft.

Here are the steps:

  1. Wash your hands – having clean hands keep more dirt and bacteria from entering your face
  2. Open your pores with warm water – open pores allow access to deep dirt beneath the surface
  3. Apply a coin sized amount of cleanser in your hand
  4. Apply the cleanser to your face – use circular motions to create lather – scrub your entire face for about 30 seconds to 1 minute
  5. Rinse your face – thoroughly and with warm water
  6. Gently blot your face to dry